All posts by BDIA Editors

SEC Charges PE Adviser for Unregistered Brokerage Activity

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) on June 1, 2016 announced a settled enforcement action against a private equity fund manager (Adviser) for acting as a broker-dealer without registering. The case is significant because it calls into doubt certain compensation practices that became nearly universal among private equity firms following SEC staff guidance.

The issue of unregistered brokerage activities by private equity fund advisers has been raised in the context of examinations and other inquiries to unregistered entities. In many cases, private equity fund advisers have been able to respond to the SEC staff’s questions without enforcement action being taken. In light of this latest action, it remains to be seen whether there has been a shift in the SEC’s or its staff’s position, which could lead to wholesale revamping of private equity fund fee structures or result in the registration of fund advisers as broker-dealers. Private equity fund advisers may wish to review their fee structures and other activities in light of the SEC’s recent action.

Read more here: SEC Charges Private Equity Adviser for Unregistered Brokerage Activity

Déjà Vu All Over Again – FINRA Revisits Mutual Fund Sales Charge Waivers

The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority is once again taking a close look at member firm mutual fund sales practices and sales charge waivers (Mutual Fund Waiver Sweep) in the U.S. FINRA’s target exam letter seeks information about mutual fund sales to retirement plans and charitable accounts, as well as the sales charge waivers that mutual funds make available to eligible purchasers. FINRA’s Mutual Fund Waiver Sweep covers the period from January 1, 2011 through December 31, 2015 and, as drafted, seeks responses from FINRA member firms by June 10, 2016.

Read more here:Déjà Vu All Over Again – FINRA Takes Another Look at Mutual Fund Sales Charge Waivers

SEC/FDIC Propose Dodd-Frank BD Resolution Rules

Troubled financial institutions, some with substantial broker-dealer operations, played a prominent role in the 2008 financial crisis. In an effort to protect the financial system from serious threats posed by significant nonbank financial companies in financial distress, Congress enacted Title II of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank Act) to provide for an orderly liquidation of such entities under the supervision of federal authorities. Federal regulators have proposed rules that would implement the provisions of Title II in regard to the resolution of a large broker-dealer. Most notably, the proposed rules address how a “bridge broker or dealer” could be used in connection with the liquidation of a “covered broker or dealer.”

Read more here: SEC and FDIC Propose Dodd-Frank Broker-Dealer Resolution Rules

OCIE 2016 Exam Priorities: Retail Investors, Market-wide Risks and Data Analytics

The Office of Compliance Inspections and Examinations (OCIE) of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) on January 11, 2016 announced its examination priorities for this year, which “address issues across a variety of financial institutions, including investment advisers, investment companies, broker-dealers, transfer agents, [and] clearing agencies.” The priorities, as in 2015, focus on the following: protecting retail investors and investors saving for retirement; assessing market-wide risks; and using data analytics to identify elevated risk profiles and signal potential illegal activity.

In a separate letter, OCIE identified its priorities for the national securities exchanges.

Read more here: SEC 2016 Examination Priorities Focus on Retail Investors, Market-wide Risks and Data Analytics

Proposed SEC Rule Governing Derivatives and Short Sales

On Dec. 11, 2015, the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) issued a release proposing the adoption of new Rule 18f-4 under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (the “1940 Act”). The proposed rule, if adopted as proposed, will establish new limitations on the use of derivatives by registered investment companies and business development companies (collectively, “regulated funds”). It will also regulate other trading practices of such funds (including short sales of securities) that are deemed to involve the issuance of “senior securities.” Hedge funds and other private investment funds will not be subject to the rule.

Read more here: SEC Proposes Rule Governing the Use of Derivatives and Short Sales